Info

Ways & Means

Ways and Means is a small radio show featuring bright ideas for how to improve human society. The show is produced by the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.
RSS Feed
Ways & Means
2019
June
April
March
February


2018
October
June
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
May
March
February


2016
December
November
October
September
June
April
March
January


2015
December
November


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2018
Oct 22, 2018

Season 4 of Ways & Means will be available in January.

 

(Music: Blue Dot Sessions)

Jun 6, 2018

For more than a decade, a multinational team of researchers has been exploring ways get mental healthcare to nearly 50 million orphans in Africa.

With a new, five-year $3.4 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, a team led by professors Kathryn Whetten at Duke and Shannon Dorsey at the University of Washington is testing a novel approach. They are training local people with no mental health background to provide Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in schools and community health centers, under the supervision of lay supervisors. And the idea is working.

Mar 28, 2018

More than 800 women die in childbirth every day in the developing world - often because doctors know what to do, they just don't do it. (There's even a name for this: the know-do gap.) In this episode, testing different types of incentives for getting doctors to do the right thing during the birth of a child.

Sponsor: Josiah Charles Trent Memorial Foundation Endowment Fund.

Original Music by David Schulman.

Additional Music by Blue Dot Sessions.

Feb 25, 2018

Before the 1960s, colleges routinely used gender quotas to suppress the number of women on campus. Some colleges excluded women entirely. There's a curious backstory to how more women ended up in college, and it starts with the Soviet’s launch of the satellite Sputnik in 1957. In this episode: turning politics of crisis into a law that eventually opened the door to college to millions of American women.

Jan 31, 2018

Duke professor Philip J. Cook has been tracking the underground gun market in the U.S. for the last 15 years. For one project, his team went to one of the largest jails in the country and asked the inmates a simple question: "Where do you get your guns?" Also, former Chicago gang member "Samuel" talks candidly about his experiences with guns. Before his 15th birthday, Samuel had shot someone, and been shot himself.

1